Nature&
Nature&

Nature's God: The Heretical Origins of the American Republic

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Longlisted for the National Book Award. Where did the ideas come from that became the cornerstone of American democracy?

America’s founders intended to liberate us not just from one king but from the ghostly tyranny of supernatural religion. Drawing deeply on the study of European philosophy, Matthew Stewart brilliantly tracks the ancient, pagan, and continental ideas from which America’s revolutionaries drew their inspiration. In the writings of Spinoza, Lucretius, and other great philosophers, Stewart recovers the true meanings of “Nature’s God,” “the pursuit of happiness,” and the radical political theory with which the American experiment in self-government began.

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Phillip Sawyer
Excellent work!

The author ably shows how Enlightenment scepticism influenced the American Revolution.
My only complaint is that sometimes he so delved into various abtruse philosophical points that he seemed to forget he was discussing the American Revolution.


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